August 28, 2015

By Bridget Abernathy 

August 28, 2015

By William M. Fountain

 

August 28, 2015

By Nicole Ward Gauthier & Kimberly Leonberger

 
 

August 28, 2015

By Ellen Crocker 

August 28, 2015

By Josie Miller

June 8, 2015

By William M. Fountain

 

Green industry professionals are often asked the name of their favorite plant. Without hesitation many reply, “Ahhh, the next one I discover.” The excitement of introducing new species into landscapes is a double edge sword. It has resulted in plants like bush honeysuckle and kudzu that have escaped and degraded natural systems. Other species like ginkgo and zelkova can turn inhospitable urban sites into green oases without being invasive. What are the biological characteristics that make some species invasive? Can we use these characteristics to select species that will provide us with environmental benefits without becoming problems?

June 5, 2015

By Bridget Abernathy 

 

Our urban forests are dynamic ecosystems comprised of native and non-native species of plants and animals. Some species are part of artificially created environments, while others are part of remnant or restored native ecosystems. Native species provide special value to urban forests. They have adapted and evolved with our landscape over thousands of years, and generally live in reasonable balance with their competitors, diseases, or predators that limit their abundance. Native trees, shrubs, and other vegetation provide beauty to our landscape and preserve our natural heritage, create habitat and a food source for wildlife, require less water and maintenance after establishment, and can help reverse the trend of species loss.

June 5, 2015

By Beverly James 

 

Urban forests are a vital component of urban biodiversity, influencing the presence and abundance of many other species. An urban forest that includes a rich diversity of native trees and shrubs provides important food sources for the region’s birds, mammals, and invertebrates. Lepidoptera, the second largest insect order comprised of butterflies and moths, feed predominantly on native plants as caterpillars. Moving up the food chain, these caterpillars provide essential protein-rich meals for migratory and resident songbirds during spring and summer months.

June 5, 2015

By Ellen Crocker

 

After a long hard winter, the Bluegrass is ready for summer! Trees are leafed out, flowers are blooming and our urban forests have woken up from a long nap. However, unwelcomed disease symptoms are already creeping in. Have you noticed spots or distorted growths on the leaves of your deciduous trees and shrubs?  

April 24, 2015

By Lee Townsend

 

Aphids are among the first insects to appear on trees in the spring. They thrive under cool, rainy, conditions; our weather pattern to date has favored them.